The Household Spotify Playlist Competition – ONE

I have spent an absurd amount of time today (unsuccessfully) trying to update my computer to Windows10, so I’ve been doing a lot of just sitting around waiting for things to happen. Instead of getting hellaciously frustrated – okay, well, in addition to getting hellaciously frustrated, I decided to use my unexpected thumb-twiddling hours to make some headway on a playlist project I’ve been swearing I’m going to work on for a couple months now.

Back in June, Mr. Krikket started making a playlist on Spotify where he chose a single song from each artist he wanted to add. Once I had an opportunity to listen to most of it (we use Spotify in the car all the time, and in the house pretty damn often), I decided to make one of my own in which I would correct all the blatantly wrong songs he chose and add in a bunch of artists that he left off.

Mr. Krikket’s Playlist – Uno

We’re only slightly competitive, I swear.

My Playlist – <two

I still need to go through and add some more things (I am struggling to choose just one song from a bunch of my favorite artists), and I will, of course, give him the chance to rebut my choices for musicians he overlooked.

But mostly, where he has a band or singer I don’t, it’s for one of two reasons. Either I am just not familiar with their work, or he has, in my opinion, already chosen the definitively correct song, and I had no counter.

True confession: I initially gave him a hard time about the whole thing – I was a dedicated mix-tape maker in my youth, and I still struggle with just tossing a bunch of music together that doesn’t necessarily fit. I’m absolutely enjoying the process, though, despite the fact it’s led to more than one jarring transitions.


If you want to play along, the rules are simple.

  • Pick a playlist name that is something like (but not actually) “One”.
  • Choose a single song per artist using whatever criteria you like. You might pick your favorite, or the most famous, or the one you think best represents their body of work, whatever you like.
  • You can use one song by a band, and then another by an artist previously in that band who went solo (or joined another band later on). As long as the artist name is unique, you’re good.
  • Find a friend who’s approximately the same level of opinionated about music as you are, and send them your list. Cross your fingers that chaos ensues.
  • Relive the glory days of swapping mixtapes (or ok, mix CDs for the younger folks).